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Joe Ormond
5 Posts
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1
22nd April 2024 - 9:20 pm
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Hello ,

My name is Joe and have just bought myself a twister.

She is called Spindrift but previously she went by the name of Sally Loper.

I am a wooden boatbuilder ,grew up sailing classics and have owned a couple of gaff cutters in the past ,so grp and the twisters rig is fairly new to me.

Work colleagues and friend's tell me I have turned ,gone to the dark side .Spindrift is looking a little tired but once the limited wood work is done ,decks sorted ,standing rigging done  and numerous other things ,I'll have a fine boat that requires little maintenance compared to my last boats which required rebuild, restoration and endless maintenance. 

Spindrift is currently on hard standing at gallows point Beaumaris, Anglesey. 

I will probably have some questions over the coming months to put to the association for advice. So I will kick off with my first.

Spindrifts back stays are fastened through the deck ,about 2 inches fwd of the transom ,but twisters I have seen  they have them fastened to the transom ,twisted stainless plate fastened through top of transom ,can anyone tell me what the difference is?

Also I believe I have a 150% furling genoa, is this the largest for a twister ? And would 150% not be the right choice for a single hander. 

Oh and it's very tired ,so need to replace .does anyone know where I might find a second hand furling genoa for sale?

Thanks for your time

Regards joe

Joeyormond@hotmail.com 

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Peter Mulville
254 Posts
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26th April 2024 - 6:40 pm
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Hi Joe

I have a big Genoa too. In heavier airs winching it in on my own is both slow and hard work. When it’s all set up and tight I go to windward very well but a tack can take me some time. I try and avoid tacking.  I recently, after much discussion with Kemps, purchased a Yankee. The dimensions are on the website under Twister Specifications. It’s smaller, much easier to sheet in on the wind, and I believe has very little impact on the windward performance in heavier airs. The whole point of the big 145% Genoa was that, originally, the overlap to the main was not punished by rating rules. As soon as you ease off from the wind the overlap comes into play. However, I do have a top down furler that easily comes into play in less than about 18 knots apparent. 

I could change headsails at sea but my plan is to look at the forecast in port. Default will be the Yankee..easier at sea to change up if needed rather than down.

As to the backstay. That’s very unusual but all Twisters are different.

Spindrift was home built…maybe the builder didn’t buy the chain plates or maybe he didn't trust them. What would help is a photo. Is there a trace of the bolt holes in the transom? I don’t think this is a huge concern as the fittings have obviously stood up for many years.

 

 

You can see under the Yankee. Revelation. 

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John MacMullen and Ann Musgrave
197 Posts
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3
27th April 2024 - 3:18 pm
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Hi Joe,

Welcome Aboard! I don't think that you should worry about the Backstay Chain Plates. If your Boat is anything like ours (1970 Uphams all GRP) then the after deck is just about 'bomb proof'. We cut a 100mm diameter hole in it for a screw down vent and discovered (4 jig saw blades later)that the total lay up was nearly 38mm thick! This consisted of the deck GRP at 12mm, A large sheet of teak marine 1/2" ply of almost the same area and then another 12mm of GRP bonding it in underneath over the whole area!

Like Peter says, the big Genoa is a lot of hard work and if you have to short tack forget it. We used to change down to a Yankee if we were going to be cruising in confined waters. It also has the advantage that as well as easy handling, you can easily see what's ahead. We now cruise and race with a 130% furler with which we can still embarrass some of the 'big headsail' boys. Better to concentrate on sailing skills than raw power.

Enjoy Spindrift (Sally Loper)

John

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Joe Ormond
5 Posts
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4
27th April 2024 - 7:04 pm
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Hello ,

Thanks for replying to my post ,Peter and John and also for the welcome.

Good to know the aft deck is as strong as you say john ,the position of the back stay fittings may prove to be a problem or not ,one day when handling lines in a hurry over the aft quarter, we'll see.

The 130% sail you use john ,would that be the same dimension as the yankee in the twister specification page?

Regards joe

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John MacMullen and Ann Musgrave
197 Posts
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28th April 2024 - 11:00 am
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I think that everyone's aft decks are cluttered when line handling. what with the mainsheet horse, mainsheet and backstays. That's just the way it is!

The 130% furling Genoa that we use now isn't the same as the Yankee though it is cut with a slightly higher foot and clew so forward vision is normally OK. If things get critical it's easy to put a couple of rolls in it which lifts the foot significantly. If it's rough that also has the benefit of not picking up too much water from the lee bow wave when off the wind. If you would like I'll see if I can find the dimensions of the Yankee which we used for the majority of the time when cruising before we crossed to the dark side and bought a furler 10 years ago!

Cheers, John

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Joe Ormond
5 Posts
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28th April 2024 - 5:22 pm
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Hi John.

I'll compare the yankee from the specifications note to the current headsail I have for now ,but thanks for offer .

The back stays are bolted down through the deck and also bolted diagonally through the transom ,definitely no strength issues!

Some photos for you Peter.20240428_131553.jpgImage Enlarger20240428_131604.jpgImage Enlarger20240428_132144.jpgImage Enlarger20240428_132217.jpgImage Enlarger

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John MacMullen and Ann Musgrave
197 Posts
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28th April 2024 - 6:38 pm
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looks like you could easily do best by leading any stern lines out over the quarter rather than threading through and over the transom.

Happy tidying up

John

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Peter Mulville
254 Posts
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8
1st May 2024 - 5:20 pm
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It was an option to have Tylers fit the standard chainplates.

Obviously, the home builder, for whom I have no name, did not take it up. Looks like a very substantial job on the backstays. I'd predict no less on the shrouds. Be interesting to see a view from underside.

I'd have no worries, it has stood up for a long time.

Peter

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Joe Ormond
5 Posts
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6th May 2024 - 8:11 am
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20240505_120609.jpgImage Enlarger

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Joe Ormond
5 Posts
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6th May 2024 - 8:17 am
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Hello, 

Couple photos of internal shroud plates.

They don't seem to be original.

Ugly and strong

I'll go with strong for now.

Regards joe

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